Love. God is love

Love. God is love

It’s a phrase we hear again and again, rising from the printed pages of scripture, from the mouth of the preacher or the pray-er.

Love. God is love.

But what does that mean? I mean genuinely? What difference does that make? It’s all very well being told God loves you but what difference does that make when you’re at work or visiting your grandparent in a nursing home, when you’re celebrating or when you’re sad, when you’re deciding what to do with your life or what to have for dinner.
Love. God is love.

And where does Jesus fit into all this? Being born surely doesn’t solve everything. I’ve had plenty of friends who are parents and having a tiny baby appears to be messy and tiring, it doesn’t heal their insecurities or guarantee a joyful glow for eternity. If Jesus was fully human then surely this means there was also mess and exhaustion. So then love isn’t magic, it doesn’t turn life into a Hallmark card.
Love. God loves us.

Love isn’t a sensation, it’s flesh and bones and activity. It’s not static or fleeting, blown about by the wind, it’s physical and costly. If this is the case, then God’s love isn’t just found in the cuteness of a baby, it’s found in the life of Jesus because love has to be lived. So this is it, this is the beginning, we’re here with the shepherds and the prophets and the wise men and Mary, waiting to see what love looks like. The baby is here, but this is just the beginning, we need to look at his life, not was said about him or how cute he looked.
‘For God so loved the world that he gave his only son.’ It’s time to work out what love looks like, it’s time to pick up a Bible and read about the life of Jesus.
Lizzie Lowrie